Author Topic: solidworks 2008 AR bolt/carrier dimensions in drawing?  (Read 7084 times)

Offline toolmaker

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solidworks 2008 AR bolt/carrier dimensions in drawing?
« on: February 17, 2009, 04:17:18 PM »
Hi,

I am using solidworks 2008 to create a AR15 bolt/carier.
making the part is not the problem

But the problem starts, when i want to make a drawing from the part.

i can drag the part on my drawing sheet, so far ok.

Now i need to dimension it !!, I was thinking that because i put in all the dimensions while creating the part, this would be easy!!

Using auto dimensions is giving me to many dimensions, making the drawing to complex to read.

What would be the best way to create a machinist drawing including dimentions and manufacturing tolerances.

This is a complex part so i was thinking of using more than one drawing sheets to keep it readable

I am also looking for firearm related solidworks parts with all the features, so i can learn how the part was created.

The files i found on forums and the internet are mostly imported files just bodys but no features

thanks Toolmaker

Offline goober

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Re: solidworks 2008 AR bolt/carrier dimensions in drawing?
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2009, 05:01:10 PM »
i'm not a solidworks guru but most CAD software i've used will let you add dims to a drawing where you want them as opposed to auto-labeling everything. if you select an element you should should be able to create a dim for it and specify formatting, drag it around, etc.
someone that actually uses SW will probably be more help.  :P
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Offline toolmaker

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Re: solidworks 2008 AR bolt/carrier dimensions in drawing?
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2009, 05:14:07 PM »
Hi,

Thanks for the reply,

I know how to set the dimensions manual, but sins there are so many dimensions, it is getting to complex te read.

I tought by using auto-dimensioning i gould fix this.

Thats why i would like to see an example, how other solidworks users (with more experiences) would place dimensions.

thanks Toolmaker

Offline goober

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Re: solidworks 2008 AR bolt/carrier dimensions in drawing?
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2009, 07:18:12 PM »
not sure but i wouldn't be surprised if it's like most things- the quick & dirty (easy) auto- way yields less than desirable results, and to do it right, it takes a fair amount of work. as far as examples, take a look at some blueprints, such as the ones on Justin's site or elsewhere. those can give you some guidelines for how professionals place and arrange the dims on their drawings, and keep it from being to busy or crowded.
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Offline jmr

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Re: solidworks 2008 AR bolt/carrier dimensions in drawing?
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2009, 02:55:19 PM »
Would you be able to post your SLDPRT file?

Offline NH-Moose

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Re: solidworks 2008 AR bolt/carrier dimensions in drawing?
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2009, 05:53:55 PM »
I'd avoid auto-dimensioning, that may work OK, but it depends greatly on how you made the model in the first place. You'd probably spend more time tweaking the result than its worth.

You can either use standard dimensions (extension lines and an arrow at each end) or Ordinate dimensions where you pick a 0,0 and all dimensions are a single extension line + number based off that zero.
Ordinate if far less clutter, but often having a single 0,0 is not the best for manufacturing so a machinist may have to use a calculator to back-calculate some features at the far end.

A quick googleyields:
http://www.maelabs.ucsd.edu/mae_guides/CAD/Dimensioning/Dimensioning_Fundementals.htm

Sheet metal works exceptionally well with Ordinate dimensions, and milled parts such as when using a Digital Readout.
I find most lathe parts have features at both ends (remove part from collet machine the other end) so I like dimensions "from each end"

I'd say it depends on your method of machining.  To make your machinist happy, dimension it like you would machine it.
To make it easier to QC, use ordinate and make the 0,0 a useful feature you can repeatly fixture off of.

The latest methods go further than just the: "Geometric Design and Tolerances" GD&T. This method improves yield by allowing more realistic tolerance zones. Some call it something like tolerance of position.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geometric_dimensioning_and_tolerancing

For homemade items, low volume, or non precision parts its not necessary, but for production it a money/material saver.




Offline toolmaker

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Re: solidworks 2008 AR bolt/carrier dimensions in drawing?
« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2009, 04:30:10 PM »
Goober : I have looked at  Justin's site and studied the blueprints , but was thinking that with today's cad-cam programs, machinist drawings gould be more clear.


jmr : Would you be able to post your SLDPRT file? I have to ask the person  that asked me to make the drawing



NH-Moose :
Thanks for the clear explanation and links , I found that i gould set tolerance in the propertymanager box by selecting one of the options below



                              None
                              Basic
                              Bilateral
                              Limit
                              Symmetric
                              Min Max
                              Fit


At the moment I am experimenting with those options to see what is best.

Thank you all for your help, i think i can go on with my drawing now.

thx Toolmaher

Offline brianklein

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Re: solidworks 2008 AR bolt/carrier dimensions in drawing?
« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2009, 06:54:16 PM »
Does anyone have a CAD file of the AR-15 Bolt for Solidworks that they can share???

Offline mb

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Re: solidworks 2008 AR bolt/carrier dimensions in drawing?
« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2009, 09:59:01 PM »
Ok, anybody know what exactly the milspec material is for a bolt & bolt carrier??  My first guess was 4150 but it's almost too heavy for that.  Some kind of tool steel or high carbon?

Anybody?  Thanks

Offline Zombie_Wolf

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Re: solidworks 2008 AR bolt/carrier dimensions in drawing?
« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2009, 01:23:59 AM »
idk if your a noob to prints or what (no offense)... but buy a book on GD&T...

u dont have to call out every single little dimension, dimension criticals and what u can fit on there and still keep it clean... dont put all the parts on one page either... only one per page... i think i have some power point presentations from a CAD course i was in last year at ASU on how to make proper prints if you want em...
« Last Edit: April 19, 2009, 01:26:57 AM by Zombie_Wolf »

Offline Zombie_Wolf

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Re: solidworks 2008 AR bolt/carrier dimensions in drawing?
« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2009, 01:34:58 AM »
Ok, anybody know what exactly the milspec material is for a bolt & bolt carrier??  My first guess was 4150 but it's almost too heavy for that.  Some kind of tool steel or high carbon?

Anybody?  Thanks

mil-spec carriers hardened, heat treated, and hard-chromed 8620 steel and bolts are heat-treated carpenter 158 steel
« Last Edit: April 19, 2009, 01:41:56 AM by Zombie_Wolf »

Offline mb

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Re: solidworks 2008 AR bolt/carrier dimensions in drawing?
« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2009, 10:53:48 PM »
Thanks.

Offline Zombie_Wolf

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Re: solidworks 2008 AR bolt/carrier dimensions in drawing?
« Reply #12 on: April 19, 2009, 11:12:12 PM »
yw  :)

Offline JFettig

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Re: solidworks 2008 AR bolt/carrier dimensions in drawing?
« Reply #13 on: April 20, 2009, 07:04:26 AM »
I just looked up the props of carpenter 158, it is definitely some interesting stuff.

Look here:
http://cartech.ides.com/datasheet.aspx?i=101&E=100

Do you know if bolts are this hard typically? 60HRC in the case and 30 in the core?

Jon